The Role of Teachers In Breaking The Taboos of Menstruation

When was the first time you learned about menstruation? In what way did you learn about it? Did you learn it from your family (parent or an older sibling)? Or perhaps from a friend? Or maybe from a nurse or a doctor? Or probably a teacher?

In most countries, teenagers learn about menstrual cycle in their school. This underscores the important role that teachers play in educating adolescents about the changes occurring in their body during puberty. Usually, girls learn about it in high school. Commonly included in most high school curricula, girls are moved to another room where the teacher does “the period talk.” Meanwhile, boys are taken to another class where they are taught about puberty changes in boys.

However, in some countries menstruation still remains a taboo that is not taught in schools or even openly talked about. Teenagers just learn about it by themselves leading to misconceptions about the inevitable bodily changes that occur during puberty and how to manage it. Teachers are essential in breaking menstrual myths and taboos that still linger even in modern society.

Here let’s take a look at some of taboos of menstruation in different parts of the world that teachers can debunk.

  1. Mens increases the risk of a shark attack.

The Role of Teachers In Breaking The Taboos of MenstruationThere are no definite studies that support this myth. A shark can attack regardless of a person having period or not.

  1. Showering while with period can result in infertility.

In old Afghan tradition, women are not allowed to shower or wash if she has her period. This is definitely wrong and even increases the risk of infection.

  1. Foods can be contaminated if touched by women on their period.

In India, women are not permitted to cook if they have mens because they are thought to be unclean.

  1. Women need to rest if they have periods.

Most common in Asian countries, women are given menstrual leave (or even told to miss work) even if they don’t feel sick. In these countries, menstrual cycles are considered debilitating.

But the truth is that lack of awareness on managing periods and lack of access to supplies for menstruation is more debilitating. Sanitary napkins and other options like the menstrual cups reviewed here at https://topladiessecret.com/best-menstrual-cups can empower women.

  1. Girls should be put in isolation.

In rural parts of Nepal, students who are having their period are put in isolation. They are considered “unclean” and should not be mixed up with other students. This taboo roots from a belief that the Hindu goddesses will be angered by a woman’s uncleanliness.

The problem with these cultural myths is that they create unnecessary discrimination against women. Some misconceptions also put the health of women at risks. In these countries where taboos about menstruation are still prevalent, teachers become more instrumental in increasing awareness and education. Our goal should be to eliminate period taboos.

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